Dr. Jennifer J. Harman - Gender biases - How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

Gender biases: How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

admin Custody, Gender Biases, Legal, Research

Decisions about child custody in family courts are largely discretionary, even in jurisdictions where shared parenting laws have been passed. Researchers have long documented how gender stereotypes affect child custody assignment, and both mothers and fathers have argued that they have faced discrimination in family court (e.g., Warshak, 1996)

To access this video please purchase Annual Membership or Gender biases: How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Prof. Michel Grangeat - Judicial decision making - influences and possible perspectives

Judicial decision making: influences and possible perspectives

admin Custody, Judicial Decision Making, Legal

Numerous research results demonstrated that judicial decision making is deeply influenced by factors that are exogenous with regard of the judged case. A seminal study by Englich, Mussweiler and Strack (2006) shown that judges’ decisions are influenced by external factors.

To access this video please purchase Annual Membership or Judicial decision making: influences and possible perspectives.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Plenary Session - Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

Plenary Session – Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, Legal, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator: Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Lamb Cambridge University, UK
Prof. Edward Kruk ISCP President, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dr. Malin Bergström Karolinska Institute, Sweden
Prof. Hildegund Sünderhauf Lutheran University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany
Prof. Patrick Parkinson University of Sydney, Australia
Dr. William Austin Child Custody Services, USA

To access this video please purchase Annual Membership or Plenary Session 2 – Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion - Facilitator - Prof. Donald Hubin - Day 1

Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion – Facilitator – Prof. Donald Hubin – Day 1

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator:
Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Richard Warshak University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Dr. Irwin Sandler Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Kari Adamsons University of Connecticut, USA
Dr. Sanford Braver Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Pamela Ludolph University of Michigan, USA
Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Linda Nielsen Wake Forest University, USA

To access this content please purchase Annual Membership or Plenary Session 1 – Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Quality vs quantity of fathering time - An argument against shared physical custody

Quality vs. quantity of fathering time: An argument against shared physical custody

admin Custody, Quality vs. Quantity

What does my meta-analysis (and Amato and Keith’s meta-analysis) tell us about the importance of father contact and how do both of those meta-analyses “translate” into a position that supports shared physical custody after parents separate? Should my meta-analysis (and Amato’s) be used as evidence against shared physical custody by claiming that fathers can create and maintain high quality relationships throughout the many years of their children’s childhood with slices and dices of parenting time on weekends and vacations? Do my findings support the idea that kids benefit from overnights and extended stays during the school week vs. weekends with their dads?

To access this content please purchase Annual Membership or Quality vs. quantity of fathering time: An argument against shared physical custody.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Dr. Sanford Braver - Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Does shared parenting CAUSE better outcomes for children?

admin Children's Well-being, Custody, Research, Shared Parenting

Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Sanford Braver – USA. Sanford Braver is Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University, where he served in the Psychology Department for 41 years. He was the recipient of 18 competitively reviewed, primarily federal, research grants, totaling over $28 million. His work has been published in nearly 130 peer-reviewed professional articles and chapters, and he is author of 3 books including Divorced Dads: Shattering the Myths.

To access this content please purchase Annual Membership or Does shared parenting CAUSE better outcomes for children?.

If you have already purchased please login here.

Shared care for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers raises heated debates, and presents challenges in creating parenting plans. Traditional custody arrangements have restricted the father’s time with young children based on attachment theory, as construed by John Bowlby in the 1950’s and 1960’s.The theory warned against separating young children from their mothers for fear of undermining a secure attachment which would, in turn, have long-lasting effects on the child. According to subsequent research by Lamb and others, however, babies form attachments to both parents. Both mothers and fathers play unique and critical roles in the earliest years of their child’s development. In addition, the recent work of attachment researchers has shown that the link between early childhood attachment to mothers and children’s future outcomes is weak and inconsistent. At present there is little evidence for setting limits on children’s overnight parenting time with their fathers. The few studies available are not methodologically sound. Nor is there an empirical basis for checklists such as CODIT (“Charting Overnight Decisions for Infants and Toddlers”), which has recently emerged as a list of children’s behaviors and family circumstances that purportedly determine whether overnighting is appropriate for particular families. Checklists such as CODIT—which is currently posted on Oregon’s family court website— should not be used as guidelines for creating custody plans. Suggestions are offered for parenting plans for very young children based on available research and advice in the literature, as well as the experience of a forensic psychologist and clinician.

Shared care for very young children: Research, theory, and custody arrangements

admin Custody, Parenting Plans, Shared Parenting

Shared care for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers raises heated debates, and presents challenges in creating parenting plans. Traditional custody arrangements have restricted the father’s time with young children based on attachment theory, as construed by John Bowlby in the 1950’s and 1960’s.The theory warned against separating young children from their mothers for fear of undermining a secure attachment which would, in turn, have long-lasting effects on the child. According to subsequent research by Lamb and others, however, babies form attachments to both parents. Both mothers and fathers play unique and critical roles in the earliest years of their child’s development. In addition, the recent work of attachment researchers has shown that the link between early childhood attachment to mothers and children’s future outcomes is weak and inconsistent. At present there is little evidence for setting limits on children’s overnight parenting time with their fathers. The few studies available are not methodologically sound. Nor is there an empirical basis for checklists such as CODIT (“Charting Overnight Decisions for Infants and Toddlers”), which has recently emerged as a list of children’s behaviors and family circumstances that purportedly determine whether overnighting is appropriate for particular families. Checklists such as CODIT—which is currently posted on Oregon’s family court website— should not be used as guidelines for creating custody plans. Suggestions are offered for parenting plans for very young children based on available research and advice in the literature, as well as the experience of a forensic psychologist and clinician.

To access this content please purchase Annual Membership or Shared care for very young children: Research, theory, and custody arrangements.

If you have already purchased please login here.