Plenary Session - Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

Plenary Session – Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion Day 2

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, Legal, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator: Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Michael Lamb Cambridge University, UK
Prof. Edward Kruk ISCP President, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dr. Malin Bergström Karolinska Institute, Sweden
Prof. Hildegund Sünderhauf Lutheran University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany
Prof. Patrick Parkinson University of Sydney, Australia
Dr. William Austin Child Custody Services, USA

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Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion - Facilitator - Prof. Donald Hubin - Day 1

Plenary Speakers Panel Discussion – Facilitator – Prof. Donald Hubin – Day 1

admin Children's Well-being, Consensus Report, Custody, Gate-keeping, New Evidence, Parental Alienation, Parenthood, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Quality vs. Quantity, Relocation, Research, Rights of the Child, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Facilitator:
Prof. Donald Hubin Ohio State University, USA

Speakers:
Dr. Richard Warshak University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Dr. Irwin Sandler Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Kari Adamsons University of Connecticut, USA
Dr. Sanford Braver Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Pamela Ludolph University of Michigan, USA
Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA
Dr. Linda Nielsen Wake Forest University, USA

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Dr. William Fabricius - Three Studies of Parenting Time- evidence of harm and protection

Three studies of parenting time: evidence of harm and protection

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Time, Research

Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA William Fabricius is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology at Arizona State University. He is an expert on children’s cognitive and social-emotional development, and on the role fathers play in promoting adolescents’ and young adults’ mental and behavioral health. His research in these areas has been supported by grants from the National Institute …

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Dr. Linda Neilsen - Joint Physical Custody Vs. Sole Physical Custody - outcomes for children independent of parental conflict and income

Joint physical custody vs. sole physical custody: Outcomes for children independent of parental conflict and income

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Research, Shared Parenting

Is joint physical custody (JPC) where children live with each parent at least 35% of the time linked to any better or worse outcomes for children than sole physical custody (SPC)? In what situations is JPC linked to worse outcomes? To what extent are children’s outcomes linked to their parents’ incomes and levels of conflict? When parents do not have low conflict, collaborative co-parenting relationships, are children better off if one parent has sole physical custody or if parents have shared physical custody? In 40 of 50 studies JPC children had better outcomes on measures of behavioral, emotional, and physical well-being and better relationships with parents and grandparents. In 4 studies the outcomes were equal. In 6 studies on some measures certain groups of children had worse outcomes. In all 35 studies that controlled for family income or parental conflict, JPC was linked to better outcomes. In the 20 studies that compared JPC and SPC parents’ levels of conflict at the time of separation or in subsequent years, JPC parents did not have significantly more cooperative or lower conflict relationships. Higher conflict and poorer co-parenting were not linked to worse outcomes for children in JPC than in SPC families. JPC was linked to worse outcomes when children had poor relationships with their fathers or had poor relationships with both parents while simultaneously being caught in the middle of high conflict.