Critical analysis

Critical analysis of research on parenting plans and children’s well-being

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Plans, Research, Shared Parenting

In order to understand children’s responses to the divorce or separation of their parents, it is important to understand normative processes of development, including the development of child-parent relationships, stress reactivity, vulnerability and resilience, as well as individual differences in these domains. In that context, it is easier to conceptualize the diverse ways in which children with different backgrounds might be affected by their parents’ separation. My presentation will review published research from this perspective.

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Dr. Sanford Braver - Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Does shared parenting CAUSE better outcomes for children?

admin Children's Well-being, Custody, Research, Shared Parenting

Does shared parenting Cause Better Out Comes For Children?

Sanford Braver – USA. Sanford Braver is Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University, where he served in the Psychology Department for 41 years. He was the recipient of 18 competitively reviewed, primarily federal, research grants, totaling over $28 million. His work has been published in nearly 130 peer-reviewed professional articles and chapters, and he is author of 3 books including Divorced Dads: Shattering the Myths.

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Dr. Linda Neilsen - Joint Physical Custody Vs. Sole Physical Custody - outcomes for children independent of parental conflict and income

Joint physical custody vs. sole physical custody: Outcomes for children independent of parental conflict and income

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Plans, Parenting Time, Research, Shared Parenting

Is joint physical custody (JPC) where children live with each parent at least 35% of the time linked to any better or worse outcomes for children than sole physical custody (SPC)? In what situations is JPC linked to worse outcomes? To what extent are children’s outcomes linked to their parents’ incomes and levels of conflict? When parents do not have low conflict, collaborative co-parenting relationships, are children better off if one parent has sole physical custody or if parents have shared physical custody? In 40 of 50 studies JPC children had better outcomes on measures of behavioral, emotional, and physical well-being and better relationships with parents and grandparents. In 4 studies the outcomes were equal. In 6 studies on some measures certain groups of children had worse outcomes. In all 35 studies that controlled for family income or parental conflict, JPC was linked to better outcomes. In the 20 studies that compared JPC and SPC parents’ levels of conflict at the time of separation or in subsequent years, JPC parents did not have significantly more cooperative or lower conflict relationships. Higher conflict and poorer co-parenting were not linked to worse outcomes for children in JPC than in SPC families. JPC was linked to worse outcomes when children had poor relationships with their fathers or had poor relationships with both parents while simultaneously being caught in the middle of high conflict.

Dr. Richard Warshak - Complicated Delivery - The untold story and aftermath of international consensus report on parenting plans for young children

Complicated Delivery: The untold story and aftermath of the international consensus report on parenting plans for young children

admin Consensus Report, Parenting Plans, Shared Parenting

The untold story and aftermath of international consensus report on parenting plans for young children

Dr. William Fabricius - Three Studies of Parenting Time- evidence of harm and protection

Three studies of parenting time: evidence of harm and protection

admin Children's Well-being, Parenting Time, Research

Dr. William Fabricius Arizona State University, USA William Fabricius is an Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology at Arizona State University. He is an expert on children’s cognitive and social-emotional development, and on the role fathers play in promoting adolescents’ and young adults’ mental and behavioral health. His research in these areas has been supported by grants from the National Institute …

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Dr. Jennifer J. Harman - Gender biases - How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

Gender biases: How stereotype violations affect recommendations for child custody

admin Custody, Gender Biases, Legal, Research

Decisions about child custody in family courts are largely discretionary, even in jurisdictions where shared parenting laws have been passed. Researchers have long documented how gender stereotypes affect child custody assignment, and both mothers and fathers have argued that they have faced discrimination in family court (e.g., Warshak, 1996)

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Dr. Irwin Sandler - New Evidence of a program's impact to strengthen the quality of father post-divorce parenting

New evidence of a program’s impact to strengthen the quality of father post-divorce parenting

admin New Evidence, Shared Parenting, Social Capital

Dr. Irwin Sandler Arizona State University, USA Irwin Sandler is a Regents’ Professor Emeritus from the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University. He was the Director for over 25 years of a national center for research on the development and evaluation of programs to prevent problem outcomes for children following major family disruptions such as parental divorce. His work, …

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